Category Archive : Ski Equipment

Scott Ski Goggles – High Quality Goggles for Snow Sports

I have always been a big fan of Scott ski goggles, I always have a back up pair in the backpack. Todays goggles are cutting edge in lenses and style. Scott ski goggles have had a long history of providing quality eyewear.

 

Scott Ski Goggles – High Quality Goggles for Snow Sports

by Mike Broh

Scott ski goggles come in a number of different models and designs that are one of the best choices for both skiers and snowboarders because they simply have all the bases covered. Scott has come to be a leader in the goggles industry in both snow sports and motor sports, and the goggles have been designed to fit anyone from children to adults. With the majority of the snow sports companies offering protective eye-wear, Scott ski goggles maintain the professional quality and continue to innovate their design and are a competitive force in not only the ski and snowboard industry, but the now offer goggles in motocross and cycling.

There are a few different categories that all of the Scott ski goggles fall into. For those seeking a quality goggle for the winter sports, you can find a model type to fit your needs whether you are a skier, snowboarder, or snowmobiler.

There are 5 major categories in the series of Scott Ski Goggles, and each is designed for a certain rider type. Ranging from pro models to junior models, we will take a look at each type in more detail.

The first line of Scott ski goggles offers a high quality design for both male and female riders of all levels. Known as the Unisex Series, they offer different lens shapes including a traditional flat lens to a more dramatic, bubble-like lens that covers a wider span of vision. Many of the pro designs of Scott goggles contain either a mirror lens or shades of orange or grey that can be used for different snow conditions.

The Womens Series is the second line of Scott ski goggles, and as the name suggests, they are fit for female riders who typically have a smaller face, so the strap and plastic molding that holds the lens is better fit for those riders. Similar to the Unisex Series, these goggles come in a variety of color schemes and lens colors to accommodate different riding conditions. Both the Womens and Unisex series contain what Scott calls "Precision Optics Lenses" which gives riders the freedom of clarity and breathability.

Two more types of Scott ski goggles are the Junior Series and Race Series. The Junior designs fit smaller faces while the Race models of goggles are made to fit racing helmets. For those riders wearing other eye wear such as prescription eyeglasses, the OTG Series fits well over your existing prescription eye wear.

The Scott company has a foundation of engineering and innovation in snow sports, and the Scott ski goggles have proven superiority over others in the field.

Mike Broh is an avid skier and snowboarder. Read more about his favorite skiing eye wear at Scott Ski Goggles where he talks about all the different goggles in the Scott goggles line including motocross, snowmobiling, and winter sports.

I know I will be investing in another pair of ski goggles this season, so there are a lot of fine choices from Scott Ski Goggles.

[DEAL_OF_THE_DAY]
 snow skiing
ski racing
Ski Resorts
Alpine Skiing
Skis
telemark skiing
Heli-skiing
Ski Jumping
Skijoring
Downhill
Freestyle
Heliskiing
Ski instruction
Nordic skiing
learn-to-ski
Snowboard
Snowboarding
Ski wax
Ski boots
Ski bindings
Cross country skiing
Slalom
Giant slalom
Super-g
Disabled skiing.
Ski-flying
Skiing history
Ski Web Cams
Skiing pictures
Skiing urban dictionary
Skiing techniques
Skiing beginners
Skiing tips
Skiing games
Skiing videos

 

There’s A New Type of Skiing In Town! Alpine Ski Touring

Alpine touring has gained a lot in popularity over the last few years, more than half of my ski friends are now using alpine ski touring gear as their everyday ski equipment. So check it out and see if alpine touring is for you this ski season.

 

There’s A New Type of Skiing In Town!

by Jean R Vives

Skiers heading to the hills this winter used to have to make a big decision: “should we go downhill skiing at the resort?” Or should “we go cross country skiing at the lodge and get away from the crowds?” Well, from Europe comes a new alternative. Alpine Ski Touring –yes, you read that right: “Alpine” and “Touring” have merged in North America in a big way. What is Alpine Touring? Alpine Touring or “AT” as it called in the states, is the marriage of a downhill ski and a convertible binding that allows walking on the flat and a heel lift for climbing up hills. Combine all that with boots that flex like a soft shoe and “climbing skins” that provide slide and grip and viola!- you have the best of both worlds. Where as the terms “Alpine Ski Touring” or “AT” skiing are used more in America. The term “randonnée” is used more in France and literally means to “walk about”. Else where in Europe the simple term “touring” is used.

Why the sport is becoming so popular? In Europe, this sport has been around for decades. During the Spring, it is not unusual to see skiers from all over Europe descend upon the ski capital of the world: Chamonix, France to ski down The Valley Blanche- a 21 mile long glacier that starts off with one the longest tram rides in the world. Off course, it is not just the skiing, it is everything! The lunch of wine and cheese while admiring the views of the mountains on a beautiful Spring day. It is the quiet of the mountains away from the resort crowds. That is what makes more and more European skiers and now American skiers gravitate towards this wonderful sport.

Downhill skiers are shifting to AT gear in record numbers. And American and European ski manufacturers have taken notice. Downhill skiers now are trying “side country” where they venture onto areas that ski patrols are allowing skiers to enter that were previously closed due to avalanche danger. This is a way for resorts to expand their terrain offerings without constructing whole new runs or install new ski lifts. It is now estimated that over 3.7 North Americans are participating in the sport: an estimated growth of over 40% year over year! Sales of accessories such as skis, climbing skins and boots and bindings have grown from $9 million US to over $15 million US during the past 2011-12 winter season.

In 1996, I completed the only American scientific research into Alpine Ski Touring. In my doctoral dissertation, I stated that there was a growing shift to wider skis in the backcountry. This has occurred on a huge scale and has made non groomed snow easier and much more enjoyable to ski with fewer falls. I also pointed out that the AT binding was superior in its mechanical efficiency compared to the traditional cable Telemark binding. The AT binding is designed with mechanical pivot point that allows the binding to flex forward when you are walking. The mechanical pivot also allows for a more precise release mechanism that is safer and more predictable. It also makes the AT binding more efficient for climbing. It also opens up the options for an adjustable release binding that telemark bindings do not generally provide. The great appeal of the sport is that downhill Alpine skiers don’t have to learn a whole new technique like Telemarking to head to the backcountry. They already know how to parallel ski.Why learn a whole other ski technique when you can build on what you know? The fact is, most European skiers just use parallel techniques in the backcountry. Even telemark skiers use parallel techniques when on harder slopes. Alpine ski touring encourages the skier to solidify their “foundation” techiques such as Snow Plow, Stem Christi, Wide Stance Parallel turns and even the Kick Turn. These are some skills that are often brushed over by “modern” ski schools that try to get the skier to head downhill faster using “surfing” and “swiping” turns. They there by miss out on some small techniques that come in handy when they leave the un groomed slopes.

AT skiing is not just about skiing steep chutes or skiing off cliffs-as fun as can be for some. It’s also about skiing to a hut for a night out or having lunch on top of a peak during a beautiful Spring Day. It’s about skiing from one resort to the next. It’s about skiing untouched powder! Whether you are a resort skier looking to expand your horizons or a cross-country skier looking to see what the next step is. Alpine Ski Touring might be the next new adventure for you!

(For more information about Alpine Ski Touring go to Jean’s web site: http://www.Skirandonnee.com. Also look for his new upcoming book: The Handbook of Alpine Ski Touring due out in 2013 to be published by Pequot Press.)

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Getting out on the snow and skiing is my favorite kind of fun. Alpine touring has added to my winter fun in a big way. Get out and try alpine touring this season. See you on the slopes.

[DEAL_OF_THE_DAY]

snow skiing
ski racing
Ski Resorts
Alpine Skiing
Skis
telemark skiing
Heli-skiing
Ski Jumping
Skijoring
Downhill
Freestyle
Heliskiing
Ski instruction
Nordic skiing
learn-to-ski
Snowboard
Snowboarding
Ski wax
Ski boots
Ski bindings
Cross country skiing
Slalom
Giant slalom
Super-g
Disabled skiing.
Ski-flying
Skiing history
Ski Web Cams
Skiing pictures
Skiing urban dictionary
Skiing techniques
Skiing beginners
Skiing tips
Skiing games
Skiing videos
2013 Ski Gear Mega Super Duper Guide

First full day of Autumn and we know what you’re thinking… when will the ski and snowboard season start and what hot ski equipment do I need for the upcoming season. Here is a extensive review of the 2012-2013 ski and snowboard gear that Joe Ski Bum knows you will want. 

 

2013 Ski Gear Mega Super Duper Guide

“So instead we’re poaching all the Gear Guides and 2013 Ski Award sites we can (with credit of course), and gathering them all in one place for your window shopping pleasure. Almost a … But I guess that’s because the 2013 reviews and awards aren’t out …”
http://www.doglotion.com/essays/2013-ski-gear-mega-super-duper-guide

 

See you on and off the slopes, hopefully you will be on some hot new gear ripping it up. Think Snow!

 

sierra buttes backcountry ski « Alpenglow Sports

Wow do you know any hardcore skiers? Check out how hardcore this guy is, climb 4000 feet with a pack and skis loaded just to ski some of the remaining snows from last winter. Diehard skiers and snowboarders know what it is all about, take a glimpse and see your ski bum future! Backcountry skiing at the extreme. Sierra Buttes way up high has a little remaining snow pack.

 

sierra buttes backcountry ski « Alpenglow Sports

“Posts about sierra buttes backcountry ski written by alpenglowbc.alpenglowsports.wordpress.com/…/sierra-buttes-backcountry-s…”
http://alpenglowsports.wordpress.com/tag/sierra-buttes-backcountry-ski/

 

Are you adventure seeking and will do do what it takes to get your ski turns in? Hope you enjoyed today’s post, Think Snow! See you in the backcountry skiing this season.

 

Ski Season Is Coming: Buy Early To Save

Yes it is only September, but it is never to early to prepare for the coming ski and snowboard season.Getting a good deal on new equipment is very important to all of us in these days of slow economic times. Shopping early and buying early is a great way to save on the ski equipment you need to enjoy your winter. 

 

Ski Season Is Coming: Buy Early To Save

“SkiEssentials.com specializes in providing alpine ski and snowboard equipment, winter apparel, footwear, and travel gear. They sell new skis and used demo skis, alpine bindings and ski boots, as well as travel equipment such as ski bags, boot bags, …”
http://www.gadling.com/2012/09/06/ski-season-is-coming-buy-early-to-save/

 

Read the reviews, shop early and make the right decision when purchasing the need ski and snowboard equipment for our winter enjoyment. See you on the slopes or off piste…

 

Colorado Basics: How to Snowshoe & Cross-Country Ski | Colorado …

Winter is on it’s way! This season there is more to enjoying the winter than skiing and snowboarding. Maybe this season break out a pair of snowshoes or cross-country skiis and see the world in a whole new way. Check out how to snowshoe and cross-country ski…

 

Colorado Basics: How to Snowshoe & Cross-Country Ski | Colorado …

“Get the basics on Colorado snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, from the gear you need for a safe and comfortable trip to the best places for advice, for the …www.colorado.com/…/colorado-basics-how-snowshoe-cross-c…”
http://www.colorado.com/articles/colorado-basics-how-snowshoe-cross-country-ski

So this winter have some fun and break out the snowshoe…

 

[DEAL_OF_THE_DAY]

Should I Wear a Helmet When Skiing or Snowboarding?

After many years without a helmet, today I would not think of skiing or riding without one. Helmets not only protect from many head injuries, they are warm and comfortable.

 

Should I Wear a Helmet When Skiing or Snowboarding?

by Karen La Borde

In 2011 the NHS reported that current studies on the benefits of wearing a helmet whilst skiing or snowboarding had several shortcomings. Whilst some concluded wearing a helmet can reduce head injuries by 35% in adults and 59% in children, the NHS claimed most of these studies lacked adequate sampling of control groups, an unclear definition of what actually constitutes a head injury and no consideration of the consequences of the actual fit of a helmet.

So as skiers and snowboarders, should we wear a helmet? What do we gain and what do we lose?

The NHS maintain that the actual risk of head injury for skiers and snowboarders is relatively low. Only 1 in 11,111 ski or snowboard outings result in an head injury and serious head injuries which cause fatalities are extremely rare.

Helmets are most effective if collisions happen at low speeds under 15mph. As we all know, the majority of intermediate and advanced skiers and boarders regularly travel at speeds much faster than this which increases their risk.

So what are the benefits of a helmet? Most regular helmet wearers describe higher levels of comfort. Helmets, unlike woolly hats, do not itch. They do not soak up moisture. They are warm when its cold and cool when its hot. Some claim that once you wear a helmet you will never go back to the beanie. New styles and designs of helmets have also made them more fashionable and in some European and American resorts, studies have shown helmet wearing has increased to 80% of those enjoying winter sports.

If you are considering a career in ski or snowboard instruction, you will find most candidates purchase a helmet. When teaching it is always better to lead by example, especially to children for whom it may be compulsory to wear a helmet.

Snowboarders have also to be aware that the Canadian Association of Snowboarders, who certify and test those wishing to become a qualified, internationally recognised instructor, have made helmets mandatory for their Level 2, 3 and 4 courses. If snowboarders also want to learn to teach in the park, helmet wearing is enforced.

So what do you lose if you wear a helmet? Some argue helmets may impair vision and hearing and that they may encourage people to take greater risk. There is also a cost factor to the purchase of a helmet – at around a £100 they are expensive item.

However, if you decide to invest in a helmet, you must ensure it fits well to give maximum comfort and protection. Measure the circumference of your head from just above your eyebrows and roughly follow the sizing chart below:-

Small 42 – 55.5 cm
Medium 55.5 – 59 cm
Large 59 – 62.5 cm
Ex Large 62.5 – 65 cm

A helmet needs to fit snugly with very little movement inside when you move your head. Be wary of a helmet that is too tight as it will be uncomfortable. When trying a helmet out wear it for several minutes in the shop to get a true sense of its fit. The ear pads inside should be in line with your ears and if you use goggles take them along and wear them with the helmet as they also can effect the fit.

Helmet wearing is not yet compulsory for adults in Canada or Europe and some ‘old school’ ski instructors and ‘cool’ snowboard instructors still persist in hat wearing. This is not a good example to set to youngsters who will aspire to be like their role models, and quit wearing their helmet as soon as they are old enough. If you are choosing to begin a career as a snow sports instructor, then at The Winter Sports Company we lead by example and ensure all our trainee ski instructors and snowboard instructors wear their helmets. Visit http://www.wintersportscompany.com

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

Helmets are the smart way to ride and ski. Make the right decision and hook up with a cool helmet for this season on the slopes.

[DEAL_OF_THE_DAY]

 

Skip to toolbar